26 Comments

  1. CATHY Underwood said:

    We have a cat named alice that my husband rescued from his shop 4 years ago and she is not friendly with me at all but I am not mean to her.. I just am the person that puts her up at nite and she really doesnt like me and I dont like her.. I just had surgery on August 26th 2016 and havent been in the bedroom sleeping for 3 weeks.. I have been sleeping in a recliner but I have started sleeping there the last week and Alice has been peeing on my side of the bed… what is going on with her? help or we will be getting rid of her and I really dont want to do that … she is my husbands pride and joy…

    September 18, 2016
    Reply
    • Brittany, Paul, and Yoda =^^= said:

      Thanks Cathy for reaching out to us. We are sorry to hear that Alice is acting out towards you! It sounds like Alice is stressed because you have just recently come back to sleeping in the bedroom, she must’ve enjoyed her ‘territory’ while you were semi-away. Since she is specifically targeting your side of the bed, it is her way of showcasing her discontent/social tension with you.
      First, it’s important to observe if this behavior is indeed caused because of your return (it seems like it!) But, be careful and make sure that this isn’t due to a physical problem. If you are unsure, please check with your vet first as there could be an underlying health issue.
      Did Alice pee on your side of the bed before you had surgery? Or was it only after the 3 weeks where you slept on the recliner and came back?
      Some solutions you could try would be to keep Alice out of the bedroom entirely (day/night) so that she cannot have access to your side of the bed. This would show her that it is your territory. However, keep an eye on her to make sure she is not peeing elsewhere in the house (where you often sit, for example). You could also try placing a plastic tarp on your side of the bed as this texture would be less appealing to Alice. Otherwise and in the meantime, try to swoon her with treats when she does come to you, or when she lets you pet her. Trying to establish a good connection with her would be the best solution long-term.
      We hope this helps! Please let us know how Alice is doing in a few days/weeks.
      – Brittany and Paul

      September 18, 2016
      Reply
  2. Samantha W said:

    Hi! So my roommate and I collectively rescued this cat from the shelter around a year ago. She’s been fine the first few months after coming home, but started peeing my bed around month 4. Ever since, she would always pee the same area at the end of my bed regardless of if I’m in or out of the room. She would never pee on my roommates bed, just mine. Does she hate me or something? We are both like mothers to her and I don’t understand what the problem is. I try to keep her out of my room, buy new bedsheets, and even switched mattresses. Somehow, she still manages to sneak in two or three times a month to soak my bed. I clean her litter 3 times a day! She has been tested by the vets and I can’t figure out what might have caused her stress!
    Would be amazing if you could lend some advice 🙂
    Thank you
    Samantha

    October 6, 2016
    Reply
    • Brittany, Paul, and Yoda =^^= said:

      Hi Samantha! Thanks for sharing your story with us. We hope we will be able to lend some helpful information. Something has definitely happened to make her feel ‘contempt’ towards you and therefore, targeting/peeing only on your bed like you mentioned. Normally this behavior doesn’t just happen; there is usually a stressor causing her to be stressed and she is linking that stress to you. Are you the one that feeds/waters her every day or is it your roommate? She might also be jealous/territorial, and peeing on your bed is her way of showing that to you. If the vet has not indicated anything unusual, it is probably due to her feeling stressed about you in someway, though we imagine she doesn’t hate you! She may have become more easily attached to your roommate in the first few months and now she is displaying jealousy. If I were you, try to do things with her that she will associate love and positivity with, like being her caretaker (aka food and water, toys, playtime, cuddles, treats…) The more you can associate yourself with good/things she enjoys, the less likely she will feel stressed and act out by peeing on your bed.
      I hope you can identify her stress soon and resolve this issue! Let us know what works when you figure it out. We would like to hear how she is doing.
      All the best!

      October 8, 2016
      Reply
  3. Lyn miller said:

    we have a new kitten…a rescue kitty who appears to have adapted to the change wonderfully. We have had her 2 weeks. On day 2, she peed on our bed and 3 more times since then. Her litter tray is cleaned, she uses the litter box without fuss, for both wee and poo, but seems to have a thing to “christen” the bed…. to-night, just after she had peed in her litter tray! So frustrating, as we have had to wash the doona now 4 times. I sponged all properly the first couple of times, then ended up at the Laundromat to really do it properly. We are now going to keep her out of our room but I have loved having our other kitty in bed with us and hoped to do this with this one. I just don’t trust her! could it be , that because she did it once, it is a habit? or just an impulse? do you think she will grow out of doing this. I have never had this happen on what I call a regular basis,. the odd little accident when my other cats were new to the home. I am worried this will be a regular thing with kitty…. ideas?? please

    October 17, 2016
    Reply
    • Brittany, Paul, and Yoda =^^= said:

      Hi Lyn,

      Excuse us for the delay! Congrats on adopting your new rescue kitty, that is always an exciting moment in life! It is however very unfortunate to hear that she is behaving oddly – especially since you mention that there are no problems with her using the litter box. How long ago did you have your other cat? It would appear that your new rescue kitty quickly picked up on the scent of the other cat and is “acting out” in a territorial way. If your other cat slept with you on the bed, it’s possible that his/her scent is still lingering, which may be triggering your new kitten to pee. As you mentioned, it is indeed a good idea to keep her out of your room. Observe how she behaves. If she is not peeing elsewhere, then the “trigger” is most likely due to the lingering scent/territory in your bedroom. If you haven’t tried already, try putting a litterbox in your bedroom as well – since she uses it well, it may encourage her to hop down and use the loo properly rather than going on your bed. You may have to do a little detective work to figure out the issue. It could be the tiniest problem which needs resolving such as the scent of the litter itself. If she doesn’t like the smell, this could instigate her to go wee somewhere else. Try using unscented litter if this is the case. Hopefully soon you will be able to find the real issue that is making her do this, but until then keep trying and don’t give up! Thanks for sharing your story with us and do let us know if there is any progress with your new kitten in the future!

      October 25, 2016
      Reply
  4. Kate said:

    A new roommate (and her sweet friendly cat Howie) moved into my apartment a month ago and my cat Sebastian (he is 4 years old & fixed) is not happy about it. When Howie moved in I purchased feliway wall plugins hoping that would smooth out the introduction process. We’ve done our best to keep them separated and slowly introduce them, but Sebastian got out once and he aggressively chased Howie and it looked like he was going to attack him if we hadn’t broken the fight up with pillows and a blanket. Ever since Howie moved in I’ve noticed that Sebastian is very stressed and anxious. When he gets worked up he’s shedding like he does at the vet’s office. Over the past 2 weeks he’s been peeing in my bedroom when we shut him in there to let Howie out. His peeing has escalated from my closet to my bed today. I’m at a loss as to what to try next. I cannot let the bad behavior of peeing in my room continue, but Howie isn’t going anywhere and needs to spend some time in the common area so I can’t remove what is causing the peeing. Any advice/ideas would be greatly appreciated.

    April 21, 2017
    Reply
    • Brittany said:

      Hi Kate! As we just told our other commentator, our replies made to questions on the 21st April never appeared on the site, so we are unsure if you received our first reply or not. In any case, here is what we recommend for your roommate and your cat Sebastian. Introducing cats is a very tricky situation. It requires lots of patience and time! We recommend slowly introducing them first through closed doors. Place both of their food bowls on either side of the door, so that when they both eat at the same time, they can smell each other across the door and associate it with the positive reward of food. Do this for a few days, and then crack the door open just a little. Repeat this across two weeks until they can eat with the door wide open. This does take time, but the results are usually very positive! We had to do this with our Yoda once and it really worked well. Limit any confrontation as much as possible, and when you see them calm looking at each other or being around each other, you can reward them with a treat and let them know their behavior is good. Sebastian is being territorial and it’s quite normal. Is Howie fixed as well? If not, it will be a good idea. When Sebastian pees on your bed, he is showing stress and discontent because of the situation and he’s taking it out on your bed. Restart the introduction process and do it very slowly. We hope that by now the situation has ameliorated just a little, and we’re really sorry if our previous reply never reached you! If you have any further questions, do let us know. Best of luck!

      May 1, 2017
      Reply
  5. Patricia Blakey said:

    Hi we have 2 cats, “bella” was a rescue we’ve had for 7 yrs, last year we got “bullet”, a female. Bullet had a litter 4 weeks ago, 5 adorable kittens. She pooped on my bed before giving birth , which I understood. I just got home to find not only did she pee, but pooped again on my side of the bed!! What’s the deal? She is healthy, and the litter box is clean. I give up! Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    May 1, 2017
    Reply
    • Brittany said:

      Hi Patricia,
      Thanks for your message. It seems like Bullet’s behavior is unrelated to the semi-new relationship with Bella. It’s possible that with the new litter, Bullet is stressed about Bella’s presence around her babies. Though we can’t tell you the exact problem, you’re right in knowing that there is something going on! First try to identify all possible problems. You mentioned that the litter box is clean, but does Bullet share the same litter box with Bella? Bullet’s behavioral change seems directly related to her babies, so sharing anything with the other cat Bella might be stressing her out. Try and get a new litter box, just for Bullet. Also try to separate Bella from Bullet and her babies, to see if that’s what is causing Bullet’s stress. Though it could be due to other reasons, such as not liking her food, it seems like it’s the stress of being a new mother 😉 We hope we could help throw some ideas around and hopefully Bullet’s behavior will get back to normal quickly. Let us know her progress if you can to see what worked and what didn’t, your feedback will be helpful for us to learn more about this, too. Thanks Patty and good luck!

      May 1, 2017
      Reply
  6. Giovanni said:

    Hi.
    My cat was a stray that turned up starving one freezing winter 5 years ago.
    Within a year she peed on my bed twice. The first time she did it while looking at me.
    I kept her in the barn after the second time.
    I got her an igloo and an electric blanket for the winter months.
    Little by little I started trusting her in 1 room in the house.
    She was fine for 6 months and I let her sleep in the house after that.
    She was fine for about 8 months then peed on a bed upstairs ( where she is not allowed).
    Since then she peed on another bed upstairs and the other day on the backseat of my car which is infuriating!!
    I have banned her from the house as of yesterday when I discovered the smell in my car, then left the boot open to air it out.
    I watched her climb in and go to the exact spot on the top of the seat and started sniffing around the area.
    I rubbed her nose in it and scolded her. (Probably not effective)

    I don’t know what to do, I can’t afford any more mattresses and I won’t invite anyone to sit in the rear of my car that now smells like a toilet!

    May 11, 2017
    Reply
    • Brittany said:

      Hi Giovanni,

      Thanks so much for contacting us! We apologize for our delay, we had a mid-May trip to the US and back for some weddings! Let me start by asking, do you have any other animals, or have you had animals in the past? Are you the primary caretaker?
      It would seem that her behavior is from her learnt experience as a stray, peeing wherever she smells other animals and where she pleases! Did you potty train her when she showed up 5 years ago?
      Keep a litter box that is clean everyday, and encourage her each time she uses it. This may take a while, but it will be a long-term solution. Avoid heavy-scented litters or even the little clay stuff. Opt for a natural, all-wood, or wood pellet (that’s what we use) “litter” instead. You can find it on Amazon if you can’t find it in a store near you. She may like to use the natural stuff better, as she used to be a stray. Also, switching her lifestyle from banned to not banned to banned again is probably confusing her. She doesn’t know whether she belongs in the house or not, so her using the litter box is more like an optional thing rather than a daily requirement. If you do choose to keep her in the house, close all doors to bedrooms where she could pee on a bed. The second time she came back in and peed on the bed and in your car may because she’s getting her little revenge, though I still think it’s just from past behavior of being a stray and not seeing the litter box as THE potty place to go for every need. Reward her positive behavior, and stay determined. Best of luck, and check back with us for any new updates!

      May 29, 2017
      Reply
  7. Steve said:

    I recently adopted a rescue cat from a local shelter. I was told she is about 1 year old and came from a very bad situation. The shelter told me that they found her in a “hoarding cage” where the previous owner kept her with around 20 other cats. She has definitely been traumatized by the previous owners treatment. It took a few days to get her to go in the litter box, but now she uses it without issue except that she pees on my bed sometimes. My bed is basically her bed too, she sleeps with me every night. She actually does it while I’m in the bed sleeping, usually right next to my feet. I don’t believe it’s because she’s angry with me because I’m the only person that she shows affection too. If I’m at home she is usually with me. She was just at the vet and got a clean bill of health. I do have another cat, a 3 year old male. I’ve seen her play with him but also hiss and swat at him. He is not aggressive at all, just wants to play. I believe she is peeing on the bed to mark her territory. I’ve thought about getting one of those hormone diffusers but don’t want to have to rely on that forever. Any ideas? Thanks.

    May 22, 2017
    Reply
    • Brittany said:

      Hey Steve,
      Thanks very much for your message. Congrats on adopting this kitty in need from the shelter! We are sorry to hear that she had to go through such a bad situation, luckily you are there for her now! As you said, it wouldn’t seem that she is angry at you. It does make sense though if she is trying to mark her territory. The male cat has left his mark all over you, and because your new kitty just loves you so much she wants to keep you all for her own! Cats are oddly affectionate, right? 😉 How long ago did you adopt her, actually? This behavior may disappear after she settles more and gets used to her new male friend. The cat who hisses is the one who feels threatened, so it makes sense she is doing this. We’ve never tried the diffusers, so really can’t share our thoughts on it’s effectiveness, or not. You could try it, and see if it works. At the same time, the adopted kitty may start getting used to the idea of sharing you. If she pees at night, it may help to have a litter box in the room with you, or at least nearby, to encourage her to use it instead. Keeping her out of your room at night for 2-3 weeks may help her get in the habit of using only the litter box as spend some more time around the male cat, too. Your bed is a special “marker” for cats so keeping her away at night might make her less territorial. It seems that otherwise you have yourself a sweet little kitty! Hope that one of these techniques will work for you all. Best of luck and thanks for reaching out to us!

      May 29, 2017
      Reply
  8. Debra Soran said:

    I got Kelly from a shelter ..she was 5 years old..I had no problem with her for 2 years, then my brother stayed with me and I let him put his 2 cats out in the enclosed patio..well that’s when Kelly started peeing om my side of the bed..I knew why she was upset but couldn’t do anything about it at the time,,my brother was with me for 3 months..in the mean time Kelly started using the litter box and not peeing on the bed for the whole summer and winter..then my patio roof caved in from all the snow we had here in Idaho that year..still she behaved herself until the job was finished this May 24th and suddenly she peed on my bed again..she gets to go outside on the patio, she has 2 clean litter boxes to use, we have playtime every night for about 45 minutes..she is well cared for and loved??? So what’s up??

    June 20, 2017
    Reply
    • Brittany said:

      Hi Debra, thanks for your message. It seems that Kelly doesn’t do this behavior very often, but every once in a blue moon? You mentioned the other cats used to stay out on the patio, and while it was under reconstruction Kelly stayed inside – now that she is allowed back out on the patio, it’s possible she still can pick up on the other cats? As you say, it seems pretty strange that with clean litter boxes + a happy lil’ life, she is still peeing on the bed suddenly. If she isn’t wanting to use the litter box it could be something very simple such as the scent (try unscented, or natural wood litter). If you left her for a while and came back, this reaction is also possible. It could also be her food, which brand do you use? These random acts seem like nothing in her daily life is bothering her, so we’re thinking it could be a one-off event that made her uncomfortable (new guest over at the house, etc). When it’s not repetitive, it’s harder to find the solution. But don’t worry, it seems Kelly is a very loved kitty! Hopefully she will quit before she makes it a habit. Encourage use of the litter box and reward her for good behavior and keep the door closed to your bedroom for a while so she doesn’t get the chance to go on the bed, maybe with time it will disappear entirely. Best of luck!

      June 21, 2017
      Reply
      • Debra Soran said:

        99% of the time she uses the box…she has been eating fancy feast for a long time now and seems to like that one…I don’t work so I am here all day with her..I do go out occassionally..like this morning to pay bills, when I got home she did it again..I even threw a blanket over my side of the bed to discourage her..but she went underneath it?? I used to put a shower curtain over the bed and she still peed on that..but was much easier to clean up..would it be a good idea to keep her out of the bedroom altogether or will she just do it somewhere else?? After all the snowfall we had and
        clean up of the patio I can’t see how there would be much scent left from other cats…they left there last Aug. 1st

        June 21, 2017
        Reply
        • Brittany said:

          Hi Debra, sorry for the delay! Thank you for your reply + details. Definitely try to keep her out of the bedroom altogether in this case. See how she does. She may quit her habit, cause it seems she just really likes going on the bed and so keep her out of the bedroom so as to break this bad habit. You’re right it seems strange the smell of the cats would still be bothering her. Continue to praise her when she uses the box with small treat. Let us know how it goes in a few weeks!

          June 26, 2017
          Reply
  9. Jess said:

    My partner and I got our kitten at 6 weeks old and he peed on the bed 2-3 times in the first 2 weeks. Hes now 17 weeks old and just peed on the bed again, 2 nights in a row! He peed on there a couple of weeks ago too but we changed our mattress so there was no smell for him to go back to. He tends to pee on my partner’s side of the bed when he does it. He uses his litter tray during the day and in the nights and he only pees on the bed when we’re sleeping in it! He has his own bed by the side of me which he always sleeps on but he gets up, climbs over me and then pees either on or right next to my partner. He’s got a tray downstairs and a tray upstairs which I clean multiple times a day. I recently changed his upstairs tray to his original tray and moved it slightly, by about a foot and he suddenly won’t use it so I’ve swapped back to the tray he had before but he still won’t use it. It’s the same litter (that he likes – mix of Catalan and clumping litter) for both his trays and they’re both clean I just don’t know why he’s doing it. He’s the only animal we have so he’s not bullied. It seems to be when theres a change from his routine, or go to bed later than usual or get home later than usual. I did think there was possibly a conflict between him and my partner but there’s no reason they should have a conflict. Is it because I treat him like a baby? He has full access to all areas during the day as he’s good as gold and in the nights I can’t shut him out of the bedroom as he sits outside the door crying hysterically and getting very distressed. We play with him on the bed to try to make it seem a fun place and even tried giving him his food on the bed so he doesn’t pee where he eats but every now and again he still does it.

    October 22, 2017
    Reply
    • Brittany said:

      Hi Jess, thanks so much for reaching out to us and sorry for the small delay in responding. It seems like your kitten developed an early habit. Did you adopt him from the shelter at 6 weeks? It seems quite early, normally kittens are ready to leave their mom at about 8 weeks old after they are properly weaned. It doesn’t seem like the issue is coming from the litter box, but instead is a bad behavioral tact he picked up at an early age (could be due to a shaky start?). We are not trained vets, so it’s hard to pinpoint exactly what could raise this behavioral issue in the first place. It would also be odd that he feels conflicted with your partner, since you both adopted him he should be used to the both of you by now (unlike cats who have to get introduced to a new partner after already establishing a relationship with the main caretaker). We were going to suggest making the bed area a designation for play and enjoyment, but as you mention it doesn’t seem to be working out all too well. Are you both working? Since he was so young when you brought him home, and if you’re both gone everyday for long hours, he could be feeling a bit of neglect (in the early bits) and that can resurface each time he’s left alone for too long, or as you say, when his routine changes. The fact that he hates being shut out of the bedroom when you’re home shows his distress when he can’t be around you. Maybe getting him a little friend might actually cheer him up and solve the peeing problem on the long-term. If it is just a case of being alone, hopefully this can help. Otherwise, a quick call with your vet wouldn’t hurt! We hope you can find a solution for your little one. Best of luck!

      November 1, 2017
      Reply
  10. Sandy said:

    I have a strange one. My sister’s cat came to live with us and seems to blend well with our other two cats. She is closer to one but tolerant of the other. She is not close with us, tolerates some petting but would rather not be touched. She was the same with my sister. She had good litter habits, eats and plays with the others, life was good for 6 months. In the summer we had a couple of days that we let the litter box go and at the same time left our “fragrant” gardening clothes on the floor before we could wash them. She peed on our dirty clothes. We cleaned things up and became diligent with the litterbox. She continued to pee on my husband’s sleep shorts if they were on the floor or on the bed. He now puts them away but we occasionally found wet sheets. I closed the bedroom and took her to the vet, they treated her for stress urinary inflammation and gave her a feliway collar. We added a litterbox close to the bedroom and we add a cat attractant to the litter. I started leaving the bedroom open occasionally with no problems. Before we went on vacation I changed the sheets and told our daughter who came to take care of them what had been going on. Two weeks and there was no issue with peeing on the bed. Two days after we got back the cat got up between the pillows on the only sheet that was exposed and peed on the bed! I hate leaving my bedroom closed up but I cannot figure out how to deal with this cat. Do you have any suggestions?

    October 26, 2017
    Reply
    • Brittany said:

      Hi Sandy! Thanks for reaching out to us. It seems like your sister’s cat (now yours) had a smooth transition into your home for the first 6 months. Some kitties are more socially friendly than others so not to worry about her being more independent. It seems that she might not enjoy having her space “cluttered” or “dirty”. Yoda is the same way and he can leave a few “Hershey kisses” on the floor when his litter box has been neglected for too many days (it happens to all of us, no fret!). Just try to be more diligent with the litter box hygiene. It’s a small detail, but it impacts many kitties comfort in their daily lives. It’s a good thing you took her to the vet, but it seems like the feliway collar and attractant had little effectiveness on the long-term (since she stopped, but then went back to bad habits). It definitely seems that she was just lashing out since you left for two weeks. Cats can often display this type of behavior when they feel left, alone, or excluded. Keep monitoring the situation to see if she does it again, otherwise it may have been a one-off thing now that she has two litter boxes that are clean, attractant, clean sheets so no lingering of pee smell, and her normal routine is back. If this ever doesn’t work, you could try putting a crispy sheet on the bed to discourage her from peeing on your sheets (meanwhile it protects it just in case she does again). Yoda scratches the inside of his litter box walls which makes a very annoying noise in the middle of the night, so I put double-sided tape in random spots, and now he doesn’t like touching them so he has quit his scratching and instead digs in the litter (where he should be digging lol.) So if you can find ways to discourage your cat from doing her bad behavior, then you may find a long-term solution. Best of luck and thanks again for writing!

      November 1, 2017
      Reply
  11. Sandra said:

    My cat, Soso, peed on my bed yesterday while I was at work. She’s 16 and we’ve had no big stressors lately. Yesterday I woke up for work at 9:11 and was supposed to be there at 9. Gulp. I ran to work and didn’t feed Soso. Is this just revenge because she was hungry? In addition to the huge pee spot there was a small poop spot too. Do you think this was just Soso’s revenge?

    November 11, 2017
    Reply
    • Brittany, Paul, and Yoda =^^= said:

      Hi Sandra, very sorry for the late reply! Yes indeed, you seem to have identified the stress trigger. Cats are creatures of habits. It does not take much to upset their daily routine. Let me tell you our Yoda turns into a big green monster if he is not fed on time ^^ I would not worry too much about it, just keep an eye on his behavior in the following weeks and make sure to feed her on a regular schedule. Hope everything will be settled soon. Thanks for dropping by 🙂

      November 19, 2017
      Reply
  12. Laura Louise said:

    Hello, thank you for your article and I really hope you see this. I live in rented accommodation and a local stray cat adopted us a few years ago. She was very scared at first and took a long time to build trust. We don’t know what age she but she’s definitely no kitten! She is the most loving affectionate cat I have ever encountered and I adore her. While she is technically an outdoor cat most winter days and nights she spends curled up on my bed. We have had incidents where she has peed in the room, usually if the door is closed or she goes into a corner onto anything left on the floor. Tonight she peed on the bed right in front of me, she made no attempt to jump down off the bed or go to the door as she always has. She had been a bit off for a few days, sneezing and not being herself but she seemed better, I was away last night so she slept outside but let her straight back in when I came home, she had been in about 7 hours but that is not unusual for her. I’ve read that it might mean she is sick, and while she is so affectionate there is no way we could get her to a vet, she freaks out if we try to pick her up even and I’m worried if we did somehow succeed it would break her trust and she’d run a way. Do you have any advice please? I love her so much and am afraid she’s sick, or is she just old and lazy and not in the mood for the cold outside? Thank you, Laura Louise

    November 18, 2017
    Reply
    • Brittany, Paul, and Yoda =^^= said:

      Hello and thank you for reaching out! It is indeed very difficult to determine the cause of such a behavior. First of all you need to monitor her behavior in the next few days. It may have been a one time thing where she was upset about some kind of change in her daily routine. As I was reading, one thing I was thinking about was to try and use a litter box somewhere close from your room. I’m not sure if that’s an option for you but she may find it more confortable than having to go outside. By simplifying the process for her, you may avoid further problems. If she keeps on behaving strangely, you will have to have a vet come to your house. It may be more expensive to have a vet come to your home but if that means saving your friend then I would not hesitate. Or another option but you’ll need to be patient a couple days. Get a carrier box and put her food in it (always leave the door open so she can go and leave as she pleases). This way she will become familiar with it and associate it with the positive feeling of eating. After a few days, try and close the box gently while she eats and reopen it after she is finished without moving it. The next day, you can try to close and move the box. Step by step show her that there is nothing to be scared of. Finally, bring her to the vet. Make sure to have treats for her for every step of the way 🙂 Hope that helps! Keep us posted if you feel like it!

      November 19, 2017
      Reply

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